Souls of Hip Hop

C.A.S.H. & Artson

March 23, 2021 Soulidarity LLC Season 1 Episode 21
Souls of Hip Hop
C.A.S.H. & Artson
Chapters
0:51
Introduction
4:04
How did you meet?
7:54
How would your parents describe what you do?
12:46
Brave Star
15:28
First encounter with Hip Hop
22:53
Finding the strength
25:32
Indigenous Hip Hop
31:35
Connecting with your roots
36:00
Playing the flute
42:25
C.A.S.H.
48:46
You & Me
53:25
Advice for creative & content strategy
57:25
Shero Collective
1:01:01
Inspiration
1:06:25
What is Hip Hop to you?
Souls of Hip Hop
C.A.S.H. & Artson
Mar 23, 2021 Season 1 Episode 21
Soulidarity LLC

In this episode we talk to Artson and Carla A. Silveira-Hernandez aka C.A.S.H.
Artson is a descendent of the Tarahumara people, an emcee, poet-philosopher, musician and b-boy. Carla is a b-girl, director of creative & content strategy and the executive producer of Artson Music and the Shero Collective.

We chat with them about their first experiences with Hip Hop, finding their roots, the significance of winning awards, advice on how to create media content, and much more.

You can find them here:
www.iamartson.com
www.youtube.com/user/iamartson
www.instagram.com/iamartson/
VoyageLA
www.facebook.com/SheroCollective/
www.linkedin.com/in/silveirac/

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/soulsofhiphop)

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this episode we talk to Artson and Carla A. Silveira-Hernandez aka C.A.S.H.
Artson is a descendent of the Tarahumara people, an emcee, poet-philosopher, musician and b-boy. Carla is a b-girl, director of creative & content strategy and the executive producer of Artson Music and the Shero Collective.

We chat with them about their first experiences with Hip Hop, finding their roots, the significance of winning awards, advice on how to create media content, and much more.

You can find them here:
www.iamartson.com
www.youtube.com/user/iamartson
www.instagram.com/iamartson/
VoyageLA
www.facebook.com/SheroCollective/
www.linkedin.com/in/silveirac/

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/soulsofhiphop)

Unknown:

Thank you for posting a lot of these conversations and just really creating that space. the idea that you guys have and creating these conversations to help, you know, show that dynamic of what a healthy relationship can look like. Just love you guys for that. So thank you. Thank you so much for that. I thank you for considering us part of that, that idea, and I'm glad that you don't think that we're dysfunctional. Welcome to soul to hip hop, a podcast for hip hop heads that aims to bring inspiring people together to share their wisdom, passion and unique stories. My name is candy, I'm DJ Razor Cut. And together we are Soulidarity, connecting souls organically. What's up, fam, thanks for tuning in. This is my beautiful wife, Carla. I've known her for 11 years now. She's really inspiring and motivating to me, she's helped me so much in my career. And from the day we met, she's just been there for me, she's pushed me to pass my boundaries, where I thought I was going and took me to another level in another place in my life. And I'm just a really appreciate her for everything she's done for me, and everything that we will do together. And this is Artson. Artson is just from El Paso originally, he is an indigenous hip hop artist, someone who I think very much embodies the spirit of hip hop. And you know, when I look at what has attracted me to him, it's, it's specifically because for me, like he is that embodiment of hip hop. He's been a member of some of the most influential crews in in breaking, but always from the perspective of being a student of the culture, things that I love about him is that he's not one dimensional. He's not just a B boy, or just a beatboxer, or just an MC. He's multidisciplinary, he respects all disciplines, he brings in his indigenous culture and to everything that he does and encourages everyone to get in touch with their own individual culture, and find a way to weave that into how they express, you know, through their various art forms. He's someone that just has this amazing way of bringing the best out of people, inspiring people, making people feel like it's okay to be themselves to just be okay with not being perfect, and to just being, you know, students of the journey themselves. To story here, when we met, I used to go back and forth to Vegas a lot from Cali to visit my family. And of course, I connected with the community out there. And while we had met, it was like very much like in passing, but you know, every time we'd be sitting down in conversations with people, they would be telling me about arts and be like, yo, you should check out his music. He's really dope. He's actually like, really high level and again, he you know, he never really said he, he didn't even tell me he was doing music. It just other people had told me I cannot tell you how many people said something like, I don't know where I would be without arts and oh, arts and was just, and I was like, it's like everyone had an arts and testimonial of some kind, right? So of course, I was like, all right, like, that's, that's cool. I have to encourage me to trust his character. And I think it would be real, someone, a woman in the culture, depending on where you come from, sometimes you can feel apprehensive about men within the culture show up and making sure that you're very clear in terms of the parameters. And so that, for me, was really reassuring. And it made me curious about his music. It made me curious to just get to know him. And then just in every time I've ever interacted with him, that's exactly how he showed up. And the way I've always described him as he's that pool of still cool water, right? If there's something going on, I can immediately tell how I'm responding, because he's so still that it allows me to reflect on how I'm showing up. So he's my anchor in many, many, many storms. My partner in crime, you know, my partner and laughter is beautiful. Oh my gosh. So how did the two of you meet? At the time I was teaching Bailey Rock. I don't know if you guys know Bailey Rock, I was his first teacher, a friend of mine shot a music video, and she wanted dancers. And so I told her I'd bring Bail, and we showed up to the music video set. And she was there. She had been asked to be a part of the video Also, she came from Cali Yeah. And we were both on the music set together. And that's how we first met and because like cross past and kind of just talk a little bit in and then we kept running into each other. After that, like a few times at different events. She was coming back. She said she was coming down to Vegas, and we've crossed paths a few times. And eventually we exchanged numbers. Actually a freestyle session. I was like, Yeah, when you're in Vegas hit me up, came down. We hung out a couple of times. And then we decided against us being friends and like building a relationship and she gotta just like, bomb rise into like, taking In my career somewhere, she's like, Oh, you do music. Next thing I know my music was on Pandora last FM and she's like, I did this for you. And I was like, Okay, he's doing things like I see, I see, you know. And after that I was like, Okay, this is this is something special like nobody's ever just like taking the reins and be like, we're gonna go this way with, with kind of with anything I do is and I'll just like I got about down to that. And I saw like, who she was, and like, I was like, This is special. So yeah, so so we met, our friend's name is UT and she's a she's an MC female MC from Vegas, and they'd had done a couple of tracks together, I would say that like regarding the context of the time that was tailing to actually was 2009 economic downturn, etc. So I had actually been laid off from my job as an online strategist and associate account manager. And there was a part of me that felt like my career was moving away from my passion, which is really about creative and community entertainment, arts and culture. So you know, considering the time frame of the year, the economic downturn, there wasn't necessarily a lot of like full time jobs available. So I took the time, specifically with the intention to one build out more of a portfolio, that would take me more in the line of the career that I wanted to build for myself. And at the same time, I lived all over the world growing up, and having come to United States when I was about 11, or 12 years old, was pretty much all East Coast, but I had a lot of family out here on the West Coast that I hadn't had a chance to be a really active member of their lives, you know, I wanted to spend more time with him, and they were in Vegas. So that's why I was in Vegas. And the more that I kind of connected with the people and saw the opportunity with him where I really liked his music, you know, when we finally met, and again, it was in passing, it was friends, he was that safe person, you know, to meet up with go session with practice with build with really liked the music, we try to do research to see where he was online. And of course, all those things needed work. And I was like, Look, here's a wonderful opportunity to collaborate, you know, like, let me go ahead, and, you know, great, he'll be a client, I can, you know, get some hands on portfolio, you know, for myself, and at the same time, build him up, you know, and then somewhere along the ways, you know, what started as like a really focused kind of business partnership, other things started to pop up. And it was funny, because, you know, as soon as those other things started to pop up, I immediately got defensive was like, wait a minute, you're supposed to be in the homie box, right? Like, there's supposed to be a very strict line here, you know, so that we had to kind of work through all that stuff and figure out like, okay, like, let's build from a point of trust and instill it again, with that passion for the things that we both wanted to achieve, and felt like we could achieve successfully together. So from day one, it started as collaborators and partners. So yeah, the work is kind of like led to the love, I guess is the way to put it. How would your parents describe what you do? Well, it's funny, I actually had a lot of fun. When I saw that question. I was like, This is great. I'm going to ask them exactly what do they say, you know, that was actually very curious about it, I think for him is a little bit more clear. So when I asked my mom, she she got very tickled and very enthusiastic. And she said, Oh, well, I tell people, that you change lives through health and wellness with your company, and that you create opportunities for people and that you're a very strong woman and, you know, not to be messed with, and you're very successful. And you're so it's so she went that route, which I thought was very cute, because you can tell the excitement and the pride and I was like for her to lead with a change lives to health and wellness was cool. And then she also was, you know, saying how she talks about how artistic you know, we both are, and that we weave that into what we do. And then my dad, of course, was like much more concise. Typically, what he tells people is that I'm an executive within you know, my company, and that I work essentially in marketing, and I'm the voice of how our company shows up in the rest of the world and make sure that we're focused on the right things and communicating and representing in a positive way. So I thought that that was really insightful and no, was I Alright, cool. It kind of No, but I was very curious to see if they you know, what would they lean to? What they talked about me as the professional? Or would they talk about me as the personal and and some of the other things that I do so, for me, I think my parents would just say, I will say I'm an artist, they will try to talk about all the things that I do. You know, he dances, he plays the flute he, he raps, he makes music and he teaches he teaches kids he travels to different places and teaches kids and tries to encourage them to follow their dreams and they would say those things and for me personally, now that I know that they see me like that is really special to me because as a kid, it was everything they tried to keep me from like get a job, you know, you need to go to work. You need to go to the kitchen to education you need to they try to force me to do those things and I was just rebelling against the world that my youthful years. And, but it was always my goal for them to see me that way. And it took me you know, a long time, my life to achieve that, you know, most of my life to try and prove to them now that they seem like that it's really special team, my love And for that, I think like our generation definitely went through that with our folks like like, Oh, you know, don't don't get involved with hip hop or breaking. Like that's a negative thing, it's going to be a mark on you, so to speak. But it's funny, like now fast forward where my parents, I think, have recognized how my involvement with hip hop culture in the community has actually been a distinguishing factor in my career and how I show up in my career, and has opened opportunities for me because of who I am and how I represent some of the things that they see me doing with the community and seeing like breaking reach the level that it has, you know, where it's not this the stigma kind of thing, it's, it's more accepted and like, and now they said, they're really proud to see us working in the space, you know, and that is really rewarding for them to see something that they used to tell us try to discourage us from nowadays is like, we're proud of you for what you've done and for sticking to it, and for helping people change their mind about what it is like, my mom is a huge fan of arts and music, you know, and she wishes, all hip hop rappers were as positive as him. And it's funny, like, you know, now that she knows arts and now she tries to say that she you know, old school hip hop, but I promise you back in the day, it's not exactly what it was. But you know, she changed his mind about what hip hop actually means. I think that's our generation now. It was so new, that it was What is this? You know, what, what, where can this live? There was no role paid. So it was like, where's this going to lead you in the world? Like, our parents grew up with security and like, this is the things you need to do the door to provide for your family and know that so when they seen this new thing, and like, we're trying to dedicate our lives to it was like, a scary thing I can I can understand that. Now, as a kid, I didn't understand it. I just it was I loved it. It made me happy. Why don't you like it? why don't why don't you agree with me? No. But now that we have people that are successful in all kinds of ways, not just you know, there's all kinds of room for people to be successful in hip hop that parents now they encourage you know, you see with the kids they encourage the youth to like pursue it because they know that there's all kinds of avenues and also I can understand their view at the time and the lens that they were seeing me through so but I appreciate that because it made me It pushed me most motivating and made me want to like I need to do this you know and I'm going to prove to everybody that I'm right you sure have proved them right I've been dreaming of this home and ever since I was a shorter younger blocking that the party's getting open with the whole reason was more than just the vision it became the way we live in half and funding back then. It just kills the points the mission was harder listen to the drama when they said to stop the movement while I'm proven then I'm reaching for the top you could catch me when I'm flying if you look up at the sky Hey, Wall Street. I let go with the eagle This was given to the people now soar like an eagle because I know that we are equally spread these wings and let it be didn't know from tasting things I couldn't see. But this I know when I believe it's better when we're together. And I'm not much of a quitter. I still feel like the kid but I'm not at Newport enough. It's just a new beginning took some time to get it poppin and this was for people who will never be forgotten. Let's go get Let's go. Let's go. Let's go get everybody. Everybody can everybody get everybody get a new beginning, a new beginning, a new beginning. From the time I was young, it was something we will know. And we wouldn't let it go. We were always into something that the other practice breaking with. I always knew that one day that we would be discovered so I put it on the wall with a camera chasing all the money. So we're thinking that excuse me for the words but it was you that made me better. I wanted to be told when you will look you with no question every day I gave my all to the skills that we will rock into until they gave me chills and I knew that you were joking. That's right. Get it tight and never let it go. Take flight brake light and let's just be recalled. This could be forever if we have a promise we've been together ever since the second crane had nowhere to come in and put the beat to steady back into it. Now this was for my people who will never be forgotten. Go. Let's go get Let's go. Let's go get go get everybody. Get everybody. Get everybody. Get everybody. Get This is a new beginning, a new beginning, a new beginning, I'm afraid. Talking about your youthful days and hip hop. Do you remember your first encounter with hip hop culture and what drew you into it? I first ran into it. And it was like around 82 or 83. I, my parents were divorced when I was five. And my dad met my stepmother. He moved into her home, which was a new neighborhood for me, my brother, we went outside, a couple houses down to the neighbors. And there was a couple of neighborhood kids that were doing vaccines, which I didn't even know what it was at the time. It just looked like fun. And that's the first time I saw and I participated in, I wanted to have the most bands on the block, you know, and then we just kept doing it, trying different tricks, learning different tricks, me not knowing what it was. And then slowly starting to get educated, like, Oh, this is breaking. And then this is a part of something else. And then the movies came out. So I got to see all the movies in the theater breaking breaking to beat st Flashdance. I got to see all those in theater. So to me, that was like superheroes like Superman stuff, you know, like, this is the movie stuff, like what I'm doing is like that, you know. And that's when I fell in love. And I fell in love with it. And it gave me a sense of connection family, I didn't grow up with my culture, even though I'm sold to now. I didn't grow up with it. So I think that's why I'm so hungry for it. Because I didn't have it as a as a youth. The word culture to me, it only made sense, through hip hop at the time when I was young, because I didn't, nobody was telling me stories or anything about my history. So this was the one thing that was mine, I moved from such a young age that this is it, this is what I'm gonna do. This is what I'm gonna do forever. Okay. At the time, I didn't have anything in my life, that made me as happy. There was nothing. I loved playing sports, I loved doing those things. But we couldn't afford for me to be in sports programs, or martial arts or anything like that. So this was the phrase that I could do with with my friends that made me crazy happy and just gave me such a incredible joy. And escape from my reality that this is I knew that I was like, this is it. This is what I'm doing. I feel like mine was was first of all, I would say it was staggered. And then just like, I think, again, it's one of those good examples of how we're such polar opposites. Like from him. It was like, since he was a tiny little kid, and it was consistent for him. You grew up in a military connected family, what did that mean for you? First of all, I wasn't really immersed in American culture, necessarily. Secondly, when I was living abroad, very often there was like social political situations, that also meant that we were a bit more confined in terms of what we were exposed to. So that being said, I was, I believe in Spain, my earliest memories date back to maybe me being like three years old, and whatnot. And so we were living in Spain, I remember when braking came out. And I remember when braking two came out. And that was what I would consider my very first like exposure to it. And of course, was utterly obsessed with those films. You know, that's that was it was everything to me. But then my dad had is really involved. My dad was really big into into horses and equestrian sports. So you know, very often just like, just like Sasha, for example, she's grown up around breaking her whole life, because that happens to be what your personal passion is, right? So imagine for my father, it was horses, and that's where we spent most of our time from there. Like we lived in Venezuela, you know, dance for me had already kind of come in as something that I very much loved and appreciated. It was really more about the cultural dances and the celebration and I was always about dancing with my dad dancing with my friends. But again, it was all like more Latino culture based. The first time that I remember personally hearing hip hop was probably like 89 or 90 and I was at my cousin's you know, we were kind of on our way to the Philippines. We were moving from Venezuela to the Philippines and we were at somebody's house party and they were playing hip hop and I could not stop moving like my legs remember were like super cramped up at the egg cuz I was just this little wild kid jumping around like feel it it or whatever you know and like my my cousin was like teaching me some like the the old school was like Running Man Roger Rabbit whatever like basic stuff and I was teaching her like, you know the the dances that I knew that the Latino dances that she maybe didn't know. And friendly thing to mention here is that when me and my cousin used to be little kids, I'm talking like six we were definitely a little competitive. You know when it when it came to life. Like family dance offs and stuff, you know, stuff like that. So when I got to the Philippines, they used to have a lot of these, like music variety shows, right? So we were still like staying in this one hotel called the mabou high end, which is like when you first get there as a military family, that's where you stay until they find housing for you. And you know, within those first couple of days or weeks, I was watching one of the variety shows, and this female MC came on. I remember she was like, all dressed in white baggy clothes, you know, buttoned down whatever, super fanged out bangs with like the big poofy hair, and she was rapping. And I remember like, to this day, I'm still trying to figure out if I can track down exactly what her name was and who she was. But that was the first time that I saw hip hop as a performance, in terms of like, finding out that braking was actually still something that people did and not just something that I saw in movies. That didn't happen until I was I was a 17 year old sophomore in college at USF. Right. There was a sky that had moved down. His name was Jesse, he'd come from Boston, and he had, you know, a B boy summit video, right. And he was a B boy. And you know, some of the homies like, they had all kind of started this little crew in Gainesville. And that for me was like, Oh, so of course, that's kind of where it started for me in terms of being able to connect to the culture and the live community here in the US, right. So like I said, there's different pockets and little bits of exposure, but in terms of like, where it really became a significant part of my life, I was already like, 17, on the brink of turning 18. And I actually didn't have time for anything after school because all I did was ride horses. I was highly competitive when it came to equestrian sports at the time. I was supposed to represent the Philippines in the junior Asian Games at one point, you know, so that was all consuming. So it wasn't really until college that there was a little bit more of what my family wanted me to do and the person that they wanted me to be and when I actually had an opportunity to just connect my own personal passions and what that turned into. And you know, the rest is history. I think. You went to UF? I thought you went to FSU girl I did the Florida tour. I actually started at USF. Let's just say that first year didn't go so well. So I went from USF to FSU. But then when my sister graduated FSU that last year, I really didn't enjoy being in Tallahassee. So then I went back, you know, to Gainesville where I finished up my a, but on top of that, for me, it was always about having a competitive internship because I always felt like that was going to be more valuable, right like Gainesville, just like they had one television station that had one radio station that had one newspaper. And so I made it a point to transfer back down to Miami and go to FIU specifically because I wanted to make sure that I had an internship you know, locked in. And that would be what would distinguish me from other college graduates out the gate. That's how it went. I literally did the Florida tour. Artson, on your last album, brave star, you start out saying it took me a minute to find the strength to be brave enough to step my power and shine my light. Can you share how you found your strength and courage? I think it's been a lot of learning goal from a lot of different places within me. There was a lot, a lot of my life spit in guilt for things that I did. As a young kid, I spent a lot of time chasing this dream that I'm in. I spent a lot of time trying to get here, the fast way trying to force the issue. I live with a lot of guilt, but it was letting go of all that. And really it started when I met Carla. Even at that time, I was still like, involved in things that probably I shouldn't have. Not nothing I regret because it's made me who I am. It's made me the man I am and gave me the experiences that I have become, right that whole idea of sharing in all aspects of my life. So I share people shed friendship family shed shed in offset a lot of things that weren't helping me. If it's not helping me, why am I going to do it? You know, like, personally, you know, so it just took that time to realize that, that I'm a good person that I'm okay you know that I can do these things and that dreams can happen for me success can happen for me, you know, I am good at this these arts that I'm doing you know all those things, you know, once I was able to let go of a lot of the pain that I was carrying, so looking at myself and being okay with myself, I guess and I just healing healing myself healing my spirit every month mental hearing my healing my physical. And yeah, so that's really everything that I'm talking about. Is it really the album, even the title brave star, it's about being brave, you know, being brave to be the star that you are, you know the light that you are. I feel that when somebody finds their peace or their light Press that to the community, you have to kind of be brave to do it, because you're going to get ridiculed, people are gonna judge you. And also you're gonna have to be strong enough to hold that space because it's a responsibility. It's a huge responsibility to, to walk in your life amongst your community. Because people are watching, you know, they're watching you steps and watching what you're doing. So, yeah, that's kind of where all that comes from. It's just like, me looking at myself, me looking at my spirit and wanting it to shine by this account. From my understanding, you're a descendant of the Tarahumara people, could you share with us what you think people should know about indigenous hip hop artists, and maybe shed some light on some common misperceptions that you're faced with hip hop. There's a reason why I was created here in the States, I feel like there's a certain spirit, and I feel it globally amongst indigenous people and tribal people. But because it was created here, it's a spirit more than more than the title hip hop, it's a certain spirit that comes with the people coming together to express themselves through the these arts that we have. And we've been doing it for 1000s of years, you know, we've, we've been listening to the drum, we've been singing and telling our stories, we've been dancing and putting our hands on the earth to feel it, and to connect with it. And also Dancing with the Stars, we've been aligning like that, for forever, we've been painting and telling our stories, our mountains that tell the story of history, forever, these are the things that our people do, and are gravitated towards. And also, it brings you a joy, you know, it brings you a certain happiness when you do these things. And without them, when you're not expressing like that your spirit suffers, and you could feel it, you need to do it, you need to express. And so I feel like that is indigenous hip hop, because around the world, it's the same story. It's the same thing. And we all we come together and be getting this circle, we create this circle. If you see tribal dances or tribal people and they're playing a drum, and the dance happens, they it naturally forms that circle because it could because of circular energy. You know, it could be two people in their circular energy within them. That to me, that is what indigenous hip hop is. You know, that's, that's what it is. As far as the misconceptions is that, you know, there's people out there that don't even don't even know that we're still around, straight up that, oh, they're still Indians, you know, like, that's a thing. You know, like, that's really a thing. And so, well, why don't why aren't you wearing feathers? You know, why don't you have, you know, a leather skirt on? Or do you shoot a barn arrow, like those things are like, you know, the typical terrier stereotypes of those things, you know, but it was not like, from the beginning. I was like, I'm an indigenous hip hop artist. You know, like, I was just the kid doing it, like, for a long time, you know. And even when I met Carla, I kinda wasn't even accepted into the indigenous hip hop world. I was just, I was already just doing hip hop, I had already worked with people that I looked up to, and that I respected like, at the time, I had already worked like Craig g tach from alcoholics, planet, Asia, wildchild. I worked with these amazing people. But it was never like, this is indigenous hip hop. It was just like, this is hip hop. Then I started like, seeing the indigenous hip hop world. And I was like, dang, like, we already speaking these. Amongst the homies, like, we're like, okay, we're doing this, this thing that's ancient. And I already knew about indigenous, some indigenous hip hop jams that had happened in history. Shout out to the Fredo family peace I'm seeing and Brian who did a culture shock. And there was already jams, native jams that brought all the elements together. But when I saw that there was a movement within MCs that were like, this is indigenous hip hop. I remember, there was a time where me and Carla had a conversation. I was like, I need to be recognized by my people. This is what I need to do, you know. And so I went, I was like, This is what I got to do. And I started, like trying, and then it kind of I kind of got accepted into that world of indigenous hip hop music. I feel like grateful for it. I'm really grateful for it. And at the same time, I also like tell people in the indigenous world because there'll be there'll be times where it's almost like I'm putting that box known, like you're you're an indigenous hip hop artist, and I'm like, No, I'm a hip hop artist. That is indigenous. Hip Hop before anything, because I didn't even grow up with my culture like that. It was hip hop that led me to my culture. And in all reality, it was black culture that led me to my indigenous roots to lead me into who I am today. If I didn't grow up in the hood, and I didn't grow with my homies that were teaching me about black history, and they were the ones that were made me feel proud to learn about my people. It was not my older homies that were like, yo, That's dope. You're learning about all these people, but you need What about your people. And you know, I'm grateful for all of that, that led me to my understanding of who I am my understanding of who I am. And you were recognized with the best narrator music video for the Native American Music Awards. Yeah, in 2017, I got my first Native American Music Award, it was for the never give up video was keys, IMC and Superman. And then the following year, we got the best hip hop rap award for the brave star album. And then the next year, we were at an indigenous Music Awards in Canada. And yeah, it's been a It's been an amazing journey just to like, be recognized like that, for my people. I feel even getting my first award. It was like, dang, this is like super special, like, first award I get is by my people. Like, it was like a huge deal. For me. This is really important, you know, amazing. How about you, Carla, that hip hop allow you to connect with your roots. You know, I'm someone that grew up around the world. But I'm Cuban. And I'm Filipino. And I always thought that I knew my culture and my roots. Because, you know, I grew up with a lot of my Filipino family members, we shared meals together, etc. But then there was a certain point where I came to realize that because we grown up, as military folks that grew up all over the world, a lot of that had really been diluted. And it was almost like just a level of awareness. Like my, my family traditions don't necessarily fully capture my Filipino culture, some of the things that I want to do is even, there's a documentary film that I want to work on that I've started to piece together, that starts to touch on, there's hip hop culture, there's hip hop history, but it's also like this, let's break it down. Filipinos has been, you know, highly influential in the world of hip hop across the board, whether it's dance, various fashion of dance, whether it's breaking choreo, DJs, MCs, and other artists. But meanwhile, I know very little, in fact, about how hip hop started in the Philippines, and that culture specifically to them, clearly, it exists. And I know it's there. Like I said, the first MC I ever saw was a female MC in the Philippines. And so it's a lot of curiosity and just realizing that, you know, there's a cultural history, just in terms of our indigenous ethnic roots. But then there's also how does that fit into this overall fabric of hip hop culture, I it's an area that I find immensely interesting, you know, and that's just really something that I hope that we can all collectively do a lot more and share a lot more about, you know, I think it's important for us to realize that hip hop is calling you to find yourself, it doesn't matter what walk of life you come from, it's asking you to look past yourself behind yourself, it's asking you to tap in with your ancestors, it's asking you to tap in with what they did for you to be here, how they probably did some of the things that you're doing, like, I'm sure a lot of all of our ancestors that know, they felt a certain way know, that I'm sure they all had dreams of doing something, you know, maybe they played an instrument, maybe they were in a band, maybe they used to paint, you know, maybe they did these things. It's asking us to do that. And I feel like, we can't forget that. Sometimes I feel that B boys and B girls get caught up in so much of the braking aspect of it like wanting to learn the history of moves in skill, the skill of it, you know what, it's so much more, it's so much deeper than just dancing. Like if you're thinking that hip hop is like breaking his hip hop, yes, but it's only a part. It's only a part and it's really asking you to learn about yourself. And I think we got it, we need to remember that especially right now. In these times. It's it's there for us to grow. What I love is that it encourages us to connect with those things. But at the same time, we bring that to life in a modern interpretation. And it's the thing that brings us all together creates like a level of cultural exchange. You know, openness and acceptance that I honestly don't think that any one of us can think of anything else in the world that creates that kind of a bridge, right? Like how often do you go to these events or have gone to events where it's a whole group of people from literally all over the world, most of them don't speak the same language. But yet, there's a conversation that exchange that happens inside of a cipher, where we understand what's happening, and that cipher, no words exchanged, and half the time we create lifelong friendships internationally, based on sharing that space, you know, and sharing that love and sharing that passion, you know, just like you were saying candy, right? Like your house became a hostel, I can't tell you how many people have stayed with me, you know, over the years, you know, I, and you literally look forward to these events, because you're going to see all your friends from around the world, and everyone's going to come together. So that's what I think makes the community so special. And I even look at all of us, and how different just the four of us like the backgrounds that we have, you know, it helps us focus on the things that we have in common, you know, and even like, the traditions from our ancestors that you know, are different, but also like, what's the root that is actually very much the same. It's just the most beautiful love. It's love. It's the beautiful. One of the memories I have during B-girl city, Artson starts playing this flute, I just remember being in some far corner of the venue, and I can hear this flute playing. And suddenly, as I was walking, there was like a silence that came over the whole venue. And it was like, there were a couple 100 people there. Just got quiet. And you just can hear this flute, it gives me chills, like right now just thinking about it. Because it was just so it was such a beautiful moment. Like the jams going everybody's battles. It's like kids everywhere, and like everything is going on. And then suddenly, it's just you hear this flute. And I was like, Oh my gosh, this is amazing. So can you share how you learned to play the flute and how it helps you meditate? Well, first, I'll say that, I would say that the flu is a form of medicine, for your spirit is naturally caused for you to eat calm. And listen. So many times I've played in that exact same thing happens where people just get quiet, and it takes you somewhere else. It takes you to a different space in your mind. Because you probably haven't heard it before. The mind reacts like that when it sees something or, or hear something for the very first time. It's trying to be like, what is this right now? Music is there's scientific reactions to it, that it's doing that to you physically. And so you're trying to process like, what is it and then trying to process the reaction you having physically to it, and then your spirit is hearing it at the same time. So it's waking up and being like, what, wait, what all kinds of things are happening right now. So not really, the only way to react is to chill out and be like, I need to sit with this for a second. You know, so it happens all the time. And I love it. There's, there's times where I'm playing and I'm thinking like this is so while you know when I'm watching the reaction of the room and I'm and I can hear the peace and quiet. So it's it's beautiful for me from that end up being the performer or the person bringing that I first got my flute in 1996 my mom gave me a fluke out of nowhere, really, it wasn't like I was asking for one. And I think she just was like, here's a flute. I got you something. And I was like, Okay, well, what and I couldn't play it for like three years, I would try and it was just noise like I was like what it is, you know. And in 1999 I went to a jam, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. And I was a performance by this guy named Mike 360. And he got on stage. And he started beatboxing and playing the flute. And I was like, Whoa, like, That's crazy. You know, I was like blown away something I've never seen. I was so high. And immediately I was went up to him. And I was like, hey, how fluke I can't play it though. But I needed that. Like what I need to be able to do that. And he was like, well, I could teach you a couple of things. And afterwards, I met up with him. And he showed me my first traditional flute playing that. I know he was like, Hey, listen to this. And it was traditional flute playing. And it was the first time I ever heard it. And it was just so beautiful to me. I was like, wow, this is beautiful. And then he showed me a few things. And then from that point, I went back. I was living in Vegas at the time I went back to Vegas. And it was weird because I picked up my flute and sound came out like something that I liked. And I was like, whoa, whoa, this is a trip and after that I just I will go to the mountains. There's this place called Red Rock and mount Charleston. And I would just go there and just practice and practice and practice. Yeah, it was meditative. For me it was it was really life changing for me like really gave me time. To like being with myself looking at myself, like that was the like beginning stages of really focusing in on like, this is doing something for me and taking me leading me some somewhere I didn't know where at the time, I knew that it was doing that for me and I just spent a lot of time out there. And after that, it just, I just got better. I just dedicated my my life to just being able to play this flute. And what's kind of crazy is, I'm not a trained musician, I've never done any type of music theory in any type of like, how to read notes, read write music, or anything like that. I just pretty much it's just me freestyling like, all the time, I feel almost, I don't want to say blessed, but I feel almost lucky that I found this place where I could play and connect like that, and being comfortable with it to do that in front of people, you know, and it's brought a confidence even in my writing, I kind of just channel something, it's just a special type of thing that I don't I've gotten really comfortable with, like, I've been telling people lately that because people ask me what's your writing process, like when you write you know, and I'm just like, you know what I feel like the songs already written. And I just gotta find the words, I just look for the words. And then it happens. Once I find like the first couple of lines are gone, like the song is gonna write itself comes being comfortable with the flu and being able to play like that. And it all stems from that, like just channeling to sitting my mind and being like, I feel like that's what meditation should be is you're not supposed to be thinking of what's gonna happen in meditation, you're supposed to, like, quiet the mind so much that something happens. And you reach a certain point. So you know that that's what the flute does for me in different aspects of my life, that allows me to almost be in a meditative state with things that I'm doing even with my dance and everything. I'm not a dancer, that creates sets, I'm like, Okay, I have these moves that I've created, or, or these moves that I've learned. But when I go out, even if I want to do this one thing, I might not be able to do it, because the music is not gonna allow me to do it. And I will feel whack within myself. If I force another thing story to be told, when the story is already telling me what it is, you know, so I just need to express the story at the moment. All of that is part of the meditation, being in a meditative state in my walk of life. So Carla, you recently started sharing your musical talent to motivated you to open up and share your music with the world. Yeah, about that. The truth is, is that when I was a little girl, I used to play piano, that was kind of my thing. And I was always a little kid that I used to sing all the time. And if my sister crazy, and she would tell me to shut up, but it was those things that I wanted to do. And and just, you know, it was just like in my heart to do, I used to work on music with different people in school, you know, I probably as early as Middle School, used to be involved in in music in some way, shape, or form. And as I said, I used to play piano, my days of playing piano. And because when Hurricane Andrew hit in Miami, my family didn't, they couldn't afford to give me another piano at the time. So that's kind of where that ended. But just as I went through college, I used to, from time to time work with people that were just in the very early stages of learning to be producers or do music themselves. So it's something that I had always done in dabbled like, my mom has tapes, you know, like of stuff that I previously recorded. And it was one of those things that I always wanted to be able to at least have music that expressed myself and that was done at a level of quality and production that I can personally be proud of. I was never someone that cared about wanting to pursue it as an artist, because I wanted to make it a career and I was someone that wanted to chase fame or whatever that was never it was always a matter of wanting to create content that people could relate to that it touched people on on some level. And for me, it was always about really enjoying the collaborative process that happens when you work on music with someone you know, in my family, it was be a doctor, be a lawyer be an account and anything outside of that was potentially risky business. You know, like I originally started off wanting to do psychology, my parents talked me out of that, you know, I was like okay, great. When I finished my quote unquote, four year degree, then I'm going to go and you know, study music production. And again, it was like, No, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, like, that's not that's not stable. So there was, you know, that those things to kind of work through. But what I always did was seek out people to collaborate with and a lot of those pursuits didn't end in productive partnerships for a variety of reasons. But I always liked to partner with other artists and help them in some way, right. So that kind of turned into helping with their marketing. Being with our son, for me was really great. So I've been working with him on on his music pretty much the entire time that we've been together. I think it probably got more specific, maybe in like 2015 or Or 2016, we were you know, we would work on stuff behind the scenes just messing around jam sessions or whatever. And it just made me so crazy to feel like I had all these bits and pieces that felt like there was something there that I wanted retain that was good. And just this frustration that I only ever had it as like a voice memo, going going through 2020 and COVID. And everything and just not really knowing what the future of the world was going to be. There's always been a kind of like this, like suffocating feeling of never having finished that putting out something that was my own voice on message, you know, and again, not to say that I do anything entirely by myself. No, you're laying know what you're good at, know what your strengths are, and know who you need to help you make it the best that it can be. And so of course, after years of this, fortunately, we we have a whole lot of collective of people that that we work with, and that there's a great deal of trust. So even though in a lot of ways, I tend to be a shine person, when it comes to putting myself forward creatively, I feel like I've been able to do it in a really safe space, you know, with people that I love, and that I know and that I trust. For me, again, it comes back to I have my career, which there's a lot of things that I want to be able to contribute and do in the world through my career. But I also am someone that does need to fulfill a creative outlet and a creative passion. And one of the things that artisan told me early on when we first met was how I show up within the community. And again, it's so easy for me to just sit back and just do me and just kind of fade into the background. And we were at this one jam in Vegas, and Phoenix was there. And he was kind of like checking me on some, it's important for her to see an older woman in the community, still doing things, you know, like still breaking, still participating. So you break. And when we're at practice, like, you know, you do all this stuff, but then you get into public scenarios, and you just allow yourself to shrink into a corner. And that doesn't send the right message to girls that are coming. You know, like, it kind of reinforces this idea that there's a drop off point, you know, every person that does music doesn't have to be from a competitive perspective or being the best perspective or you're trying to go pro at this right like and I think that sometimes we're so hell bent on everyone being an influencer, you know, and, and this high level of, you know, everything that you do is because you're trying to go pro and make it now it's not that, but it also doesn't mean that we should not share it. So it's a little bit of therapy and in that I need to get over my own personal hang ups, you know, and be okay with me sharing that out. So there's a lot of in music, it's easy to do that easier for me than just jumping into a cipher because I can say what I want to say upload it, it's edited like girl like whatever happens, whatever happens like I did it, you know, as I guess that's kind of it, right? So there's, there's kind of like less pressure in the moment. So it's one of those things that the older that I get, I didn't grow up in a household that that was like, hey, just tried and whatever you do was fine. That's cool. It was like be perfect in everything that you do. Don't embarrass yourself, you know, don't make a fool out of yourself. Don't do things that are out of your lane. You know, don't take risks. I didn't come from a family that that took risks. So the older I get though, the more I've gotten more comfortable with just be okay being imperfect, being 41 now, not feeling 41 I think it's exciting to feel like no like we can and we do and the way that I show up in these spaces feels the all the richer based on the perspective that I've gained over time and that shows up like even with breaking I go through periods where I do it a lot and then I take a break and every time I do it comes back with a different flavor and a different perspective and music is the same ways I'm doing it for me at the end of the day. You every day when I wake annually and it's to me it's me and it's to see like the wind and the trees I was dancing in the breeze everything's feeling right always when you sign on the lawn is this true painted? No, we can't do take this road and fill it up with this love ain't no stopping it as Wayne be rocking it raising the bandwidth into the metropolis. Be jaggedness No need the cause of his cars. There's more than enough to share for all of us. Keep it conscious of being true and honest to get to Leo this song let abiertas do the delicate body work now the purpose may be found in the flaggers ad login and no matter how he feels so soothing because we just have been there with us and they no guess what was the lesson pick me up and not be stressed and I don't want to if you mess and when you call me all come on and full of love No need for false and always trust in together that will weather anyway that if I'm wrong and my comparison never made me feel the lesson when the magic key Be gracious you kindness is contagious was very conscious gentle and honest remind me they'll be gone this way I would say though that deep down inside, she really want to be like that as gangsta rap. You sure? Cuz he got out of Florida girl. I say it again, in the spirit of we are not one dimensional. We are like multifaceted, you know, situations bring out different personalities and we got to be okay. You know, like, better it comes out that way, then it comes out in a different way. You know, so yeah, candy, I'll have to send you some other things. She'll be featured on like, a one of my songs. And by this coming year, we did our first song together like, for featured on one of my albums. Yeah, that's all I ever want. I'm gonna be okay. Like, if we're gonna be really real here, right, like, so. So definitely wanting to get to the point where like, his opinion, like nothing else matters in the world, right? Like, I don't care what anyone else says. Like if I wholeheartedly want his objective opinion. And if he tells me something is good or needs improvement, I wholeheartedly take it, but he's the one person in the world who I want to impress, you know, just being in love with him like I am. And I'm like, I wonder if we could ever do a collab? Oh, that would be the, you know, like, like, talk about like, how do I measure my success? You know, getting aartsen to ask me to do a track with him. I didn't ask him to do a track with him. I was like, I'm just gonna wait and see if he ever asked like, if I ever do something good enough, where, you know, suddenly he asked me to do a track with him. So when he finally did, I was like, that is so sweet. So Carla, you've mentioned a couple of times, you know that you're an expert in marketing. And you're also the director of content strategy. What advice could you give content creators, like ourselves, it's a lifelong journey to be I'm one of those I never assume that I'm an expert in anything. But I will say that I've had years of experience, I try to approach things with an open mind, a lot of objectivity, and a willingness to learn, like, what works, what doesn't work, and understanding why it works, or it doesn't work. And having the right people around you is important. Having a sense of purpose is important. How can I leverage the things that I'm learning to benefit my team so that we can achieve the goals that we have to create the kinds of opportunities for ourselves that we want? And how can I use this to help benefit my community? Right? So skills that I'm learning along the way? How can I take what I'm learning here, look at what is happening with arts and music, and optimize it, improve it, you know, and likewise, use what I'm doing with with his music, to further drive what I want the company to do to build the experience on things that I'm not getting to do because of the way that you know the company is set up and the priorities they have to show that talk having an idea versus being able to show an example are two very different things. So I do a lot of cross pollination. And the successes that I build in one I apply to the other and vice versa. Start small start small and Start close to home and do some research, it's great to focus on the things that you're passionate on, because those are the things that you're naturally going to be inclined to spend more time on to do the research on to be better rounded on, you know, and and that way it doesn't become something that feels overwhelming or you know, you you're going to lose interest in because it's, it's it is going to be a lot of work one way or another. I think it's important to understand your audience, create content that is going to resonate and connect with them, right? Like, what what's the key message always focus on the key message? What are you really trying to say, with this piece? What's the point? Why should somebody care, there's a lot of content creators out there. And there's always going to be people that are doing similar things that you want to do. Don't be discouraged by that, you know, because again, it's all about finding your own voice, and how you tell the story. And we all have a specific perspective and a specific lens, you know, and again, somebody out there is going to identify specifically with you. And the way that you tell your story is, I would say be organized. Have a content plan, you know, that is manageable for yourself, Know yourself, know your style, know your strengths. And, you know, work, work with it, and also plan how to mitigate some of those things. And I would say be willing to learn from others be willing to collaborate with others know your strengths, and know what are the things that might be better done, if you collaborate and partner with someone else, I want you to tell me the story about Shero collective, I've learned so much about myself through my job, how you show up in the face of challenges, it tells you a lot, and you spend so much time in our work environments, that it literally dominates a lot of what we do. So I've grown through my organization, because I've always let my work speak for itself. And I've always believed in what we could achieve. So long story short, I went from being a marketing manager to being moved over to overseeing content strategy, and then eventually, over the creative and content strategy teams together. And now brand for North America is also falling under my group. And I've implemented things like we instituted our own photography team, our own video team, our own interactive program, etc. So always someone that's pushed the needle push innovation push for the company. So it's I think I've just because of the way that I've shown up in those, those circles, I ended up being nominated to be one of the founding members of their women and Leadership Council at the company, that first of all was like a huge honor. But it also kind of like, woke me up a little bit, because I was like, I never set out to have the career that I have, I only ever wanted to be a writer, a producer, tell great stories, you know, but I think when you when you are sitting in situations, and you know, this doesn't work, because of this, this work environment needs to change because of this, and you look around, you're like, the Calvary is not showing up, right? Like someone's got to do this. I guess this means we just got to do this for ourselves. And so that's kind of always been part of the growth path. But recognize that I actually did make a difference. And being put in that situation. It was like, Okay, so I've shown that I'm a leader within this organization, it then made me ask myself, okay, but how have I shown up within the community, because honestly, for a long time, it was, I would do things very small on the side and within our small circle of peers. But I recognize that unlike candy, I had kind of faded away into the background and had kind of become known as Oh, arts, his wife, you know, which I love that. But there's obviously a lot more to it. And so, with your collective for me, it was, how can I show up within the community and contribute in, in my own way, right. And for me, that came down to wanting to make sure that the role of the female lens being shared as well, because those are some of the things that we've been, there's so much progress that quite frankly, has happened in the last two years. I also want to just preface with saying that because when I started sure collective versus what I see happening, currently in the community, it's it's a little bit different. There's a lot more women content creators right now, that wasn't necessarily as much the case at that point. But it was more about telling the stories of the women that have helped me. It was about not just talking about the competitors, you know, who are the promoters or whatever the cases that were kind of like the the superstars, it was more about talking about what you guys are doing right now that I love, right? Like those relationships that are actually the social fabric of the community, how hip hop has shaped who we are as individuals, right, and how we advocate for the community and break down presumptions about how people think people from Hip Hop are right. There's there's all these preconceived ideas. There's all these stereotypes, you know, but every time I walk into a meeting, they learned something a little bit different, but it's really about gender balance, bringing people together bringing women together celebrating women, but also recognizing the men that support women as they continue to grow, and excel and like, you know, passing the baton to the next generation, making sure that we have a balanced perspective, all of those things, right? This Sisterhood of folks that I would like to see come together, and in a way that just like supports each other recognizes each other and, and is there to partner with anyone that wants to, because I want us to have our own heroes, I want us to see people from the community in the same way that, you know, they, they hold up NFL players and NBA players and Oprah, whatever, like I want us to have all of our own heroes than our own celebrities within it, right. So just wanting to be able to produce content that is at that level so that people absorb it in that way just to you know, just build that pride for them. So that those are kind of the things that I look for. Congratulations on that. And I hope to see more of that actually. What do you look up to and who inspires you? I think that's always changing. But I will say right now it's the people around me the circle, the small circle that has been built, people that have learned to set a goal into it. And people that learn to do it fast. I feel also to like, within the circle that we have, we've all been doing these things. But we all kind of reached a certain level at the same time, we got to this point where we were all like, what you're doing that you're over doing that and then we kind of come together now, where before it was we were all like trying to get to this place, but we all reached it. And I was like, we're here. So I look up to the people that keep that have continued to keep doing, you know, continue to push towards their dreams or push towards one of their accomplishments and like, okay, now that we're all here, like, those people are the ones that are inspiring me. And also, I've come to a point where like, I inspire myself, I look at myself, and I'm like, I can inspire myself, like there's nothing wrong with that, you know, like, like, it's okay to feel that, you know, and to feel like it's inspired. I can look back when I'm like, like, even just this year, I can be like, Damn, I put out six albums this year. Like, that's mad inspiring, you know, like, like, That's crazy. So how am I going to top that, like, I'm looking at myself, like how, what, what's next, it's going to be better. But I'm a little weird like that, because I also like, go try to accomplish things that I'm scared of doing, you know, I walk towards my fear. Even the way I record or I write and stuff, I put myself in positions that other people might think is crazy is like something like, I'm gonna book the studio next week. And I'm going to record five songs, but I haven't even written them yet. And then I'll do that to myself. And then I'll call a studio and I'm like, Yo, I want to put the studio next week. And then, and then I'll be like, that week, I'm like, I gotta write the songs. And today, I got to make sure I do this. And I only have two days left, and I'm three songs behind or, you know, and I put myself in these positions, and then when I accomplish it, it's so inspiring to myself that I did it, I'm like this, you know, so I've gotten like, to that point, to just really be motivated by myself and inspired by myself. Because, you know, I've, throughout my whole life, I've been inspired by other people, having a drive within yourself, that's important, you know, like you, I feel like, you can even see it in the scene or whatever or amongst, I guess dancers or whatever, someone that has heart is gonna last a long time. You know, someone that has talent, they might not necessarily stick around forever, because they're good right away. They're, it's natural for them naked. And it's almost, it can almost become boring because they, they feel that they're good when but somebody that has heart and isn't necessarily the greatest, they're gonna dedicate themselves and their heart is going to shine. You know, even for myself. I always say this, when I teach dance and sound like I was not the best around my friends. You know, I was I was around style elements early on, like 98 when they were like just coming off a validly year, and they were like, the kings of the world and, and I wasn't good. I was not always I was always doing it. But I wasn't at their level, like nowhere near but I had a certain heart and drive that allowed me to learn so much. And because of that I paid attention to so many details of what I was learning, because I had to like figure it out where they were just, I could just do this whatever it was, you know, me I was like what I've tried to figure out where their hand is. Why is it they lifted up or whatever the case is and all those details at the end of the day. I look Learned a certain step really well, where I mastered it really well, you know, but I can look back and be like, that was only because I had heart and drive and determination. And in reality, I was inspiring myself the whole time. Like, I need to get up, I need to do this I need to get, it's only up to me, someone can inspire you. And you might never do it, you might never try it, they inspire you. You know, like, Oh, that's so inspiring. I might never do it, but it's inspiring. But when it's yourself, you're like, then you've got Okay, I'm gonna do this, I'm gonna accomplish this. So yeah, I got to that point. Well, clearly, I am greatly inspired by Artson. And I really respect that he always knew exactly what he wanted to do, and was unwavering. Despite what anyone else said, You know, I definitely feel like I grew up in kind of what I would consider very, like, specifically, I was playing the Filipino side, I really do. Like this whole, like, hierarchy is like, you know, you, you know, must make your family proud, right, like, you feel the constraints, or whatever the case is. So the fact that, um, you know, I feel like there was a lot of things earlier on in my life that I did or didn't do, because that's what was expected of me, regardless of whether I really wanted to or not, and if it wasn't for arts, and I probably wouldn't be at peace with myself or satisfied with the course of life that I had taken. So he's always my number one inspiration, what is hip hop to you? I would say, hip hop is my home. It's my love. It's my, it's my purpose. This is probably what I would say like, every everything in my life kind of guides me back to the values that I've learned the way that it's helped me connect with myself the way that I find peace. And, you know, the way that I want to have an impact in the world, you know, so it's all of those things. I feel like I married him. That's how much, I love you. I would say that, for me, hip hop is a, it's a living spirit that has been here forever. And it's going to constantly evolve, to help guide people, to give them the tools to express themselves, so they can grow and make it through this world with a happiness and a joy. It's something that's really special. And we're lucky to be living in a time right now, and have that, especially with everything going on right now. I feel with everything that's happening right now. It's helping us to remember to appreciate it. Appreciate, you know, the connections that have given the people, you know, because that's what it's about bringing people together. And right now we're separated, you know, we're separated from each other. So it's allowing us to remember that, you know, appreciate this thing hip hop that we have appreciated, because something like this can happen where it separates us. And it's not about it's about bringing people together. That's what hip hop is to me, especially movement that we're living in this time. Thank you so much to our guests, Carla and Artson for taking the time and being so open while sharing your perspective with us. Some of the gems we took away from this interview were cultural differences should not separate us from each other, but rather cultural diversity brings a collective strength that can benefit all of humanity. If we are to preserve culture, we must continue to create it. Whether they are raised in indigenous or modern culture, people desire to have their intuitive gifts approved acknowledged, confirmed and fu ly reali healthy relationships make each other into a better person, someone who can improve you adds to the relationship and encourage each other to receive individual hobbies and passions. Team up together to accomplish tasks. both agree on the same values and have similar mindset. Our theme music was beatboxed b Denis the Menace and produced a Zede. A big shout out to t e brothers from Switzerlan The background music was produced by Taki Brano A big tha k you to our brosky from Pro idence. Much love to Jamar Hopkins on is newborn son. Welcome to the arent club. Our podcast basically runs on coffee to keep our show running you can support by buying us coffee through the link in our show notes. A huge thank you to Power Serge Director of all the way liv foundation for all the grea work you do for the communit and making space for equit inclusivity and hip hop culture We would love to get your feedback questions and any suggestions you might have. You can reach out to us on Instagram Twitter or Facebook @SoulidarityLLC or via email [email protected] if you like today's show, please tell a friend about our podcast. Or it's Phife Dawg would say, tell your mother tell your fath r sent a telegram. And our next pisode we have the brothers Deni and Zede Marian. Zede is a two ime world beatbox champion, in ernational beatbox judge and mus c producer. Denis aka Denis the enace is a three times Swiss eatbox champion, two time Ba tle of the year Swiss champio and represents the G Don't forget to subscribe to the show and leave a rating and reveal. See you on our next episode. Thank you for listening to our podcast. No seriously though. Thank you. I am Candy. I'm DJ Razor Cut. And this is so ls of hi

Introduction
How did you meet?
How would your parents describe what you do?
Brave Star
First encounter with Hip Hop
Finding the strength
Indigenous Hip Hop
Connecting with your roots
Playing the flute
C.A.S.H.
You & Me
Advice for creative & content strategy
Shero Collective
Inspiration
What is Hip Hop to you?